Monday, April 30, 2012

Doodle King: An Interview with Sergio Aragonés

An (old) interview with Kim Thompson from "The Comics Journal"

Nipples at the Met

Nipples at the Met presents “all the nipples on view in the permanent collection at the Metropolitan Museum of Art”.


Thanks to John Martz at Drawn.

Sunday, April 29, 2012

Bruce Roberts Runner-Up #1 in Blown Cover Weekly Contest

I was happy to see that my good friend Bruce Roberts had a cartoon posted in Françoise Mouly's Blown Covers blog. The subject this week: "The Rich and the Poor"


Runner-Up #1 - Bruce Roberts
Good composition: The man in the limo is on his way somewhere, and I like the smugness on the rich man’s face and on that of his chauffeur– they tell the whole story. The hand extended out is both defining the gap between him and the beggar and bridging it.


Runner-Up #1 - Bruce Roberts
Good composition: The man in the limo is on his way somewhere, and I like the smugness on the rich man’s face and on that of his chauffeur– they tell the whole story. The hand extended out is both defining the gap between him and the beggar and bridging it.

Thursday, April 26, 2012

Guy Delisle Interviewed in Washington City Paper

The interview with Mike Rhode:


Guy Delisle is a French-Canadian expatriate cartoonist who specializes in travelogues. He’s made books about Shenzen, China, and Pyongyang, North Korea, both of which he visited as a supervising animator. He spent a year in Burma after starting a family with an employee of the humanitarian group Doctors Without Borders.
After leaving the country, he produced Burma Chronicles, a book of vignettes about his experiences there. His latest book, Jerusalem: Chronicles From the Holy City (Drawn & Quarterly, $25), is his most ambitious so far.
In 320 pages, Delisle covers the year he spent in the Israeli capital. Delisle gets lost in the streets of the city, both on foot and in a secondhand car; meets members of the region's three major religions; and experiences “the glamorous life of a housewife.” On his travels he meets and shows his readers a variety of people including Israeli Jews in the military, Bedouins, ultra-extreme Jewish settlers, Palestinian student cartoonists, and a Christian minister (who provides him with studio space).
Unlike his earlier books, here Delisle stretches into cartoon journalism, when he’s asked to do a story on Doctors Without Borders and “what they’re doing in Hebron, a West Bank city where the settlers are known to be especially militant,” he explains.
For fans of his earlier works, Jerusalem still focuses plenty on Delisle's visits to historic and religious sites.

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

Bob Dylan bans reporters from Sao Paulo show, allows cartoonist

From The Silver Tongue by way of  Mike Lynch Cartoons.


Brazil’s Folha de Sao Paulo newspaper reported Monday that Brazilian cartoonist Rafael Grampá was the only member of the media allowed to attend Bob Dylan’s Sao Paulo show last weekend.
The newspaper reported that Grampá, an award-winning Brazilian cartoonist, drew the most memorable performances of the show as the single member of the press.
The 70-year-old folk singer sang to a sold out audience in Brazil’s largest metropolis, starting off the set with the 1966 song “Leopard-Skin Pill Box Hat.”

Monday, April 23, 2012

South African Cartoonist Zapiro On Press Freedom

From Cagle' Cartoon Blog.
Fans of American editorial cartoons might not be too familiar with brilliant cartoonist Jonathan Shapiro, who goes by the pen name “Zapiro.” He is the most famous cartoonist working in South Africa, and his hard-hitting cartoons have garnered the attention of the entire country, including its president Jacob Zuma.
Using a tactic often employed in oppressive regimes to crack down on freedom of the press, Zuma is currently suing Zapiro for five million rand (about $640,000) over his 2008 “Rape of Lady Justice” cartoon. The lawsuit is set for trial in the South Gauteng High Court on August 28.
I sat with Zapiro while attending this year’s Cartooning for Peace seminar in France, and we spoke about lawsuits, freedom of the press in South Africa and the origin of the famous showerhead that Zapiro always draws on top of Zuma’s head.

Here are some of Zapiro’s famous cartoons, including the famous rape scene. To view our collection of his cartoons, click here. You can also visit his Web site here.

Saturday, April 21, 2012

Wednesday, April 18, 2012

Richard Thompson paints a wiggly line,with help from friends

From Boing Boing.


Courtesy of Richard Thompson
Cartoonist Richard Thompson's voice was quiet and reedy when we spoke, although the traces of his Virginia upbringing are clear. His voice sometimes gives out on him, he said, because of Parkinson's disease, a degenerative neuromuscular condition, with which he was diagnosed in 2009. I could understand him just fine when we spoke recently, but, as with so many aspects of his body's expression of Parkinson's, Thompson has just had to learn to work around it.

Monday, April 16, 2012

Matt Wuerker of Politico wins the Pulitzer Prize for editorial cartooning



The Pulitzer Prize for Editorial Cartooning and the sum of $10,000 was awarded to Matt Wuerker of Politico for his consistently fresh, funny cartoons, especially memorable for lampooning the partisan conflict that engulfed Washington.

Sunday, April 15, 2012

Blown Covers of The New Yorker (2)

Françoise Mouly interviewed by Mark Urycki on WKSU, Kent State University.

Politics of Fear by Barry Blitt
Four years ago, the New Yorker magazine published a cover drawing of Barack and Michelle Obama as Muslim terrorists in the Oval Office. That cover set off a howl of protests across the country.
Last Wednesday evening at E.J. Thomas Hall in Akron, the art editor of the New Yorker showed some of the covers that the magazine did not make it to print. Françoise Mouly talks about her new book, “Blown Covers.”

Saturday, April 14, 2012

New Yorker Cartoonist R.O. Blechman

An interview with Jeet Heer from "The Comics Journal"





Dapper and compact, soft-spoken and full of erudite conversation, R.O. Blechman is the single most  cosmopolitan cartoonist I’ve ever met. He could easily be a character in a Henry James novel. Appropriately enough, his art owes a debt to that mid-century mansion of metropolitan wit, Harold Ross’ New Yorker, where James Thurber and William Steig returned cartoons to their roots in doodling. Blechman’s scraggly-lined people, so minimal that they are barely visible, show what happens when the tradition of Thurber and Steig is taken to its extreme. All excess is removed and every drop of ink counts.

Thursday, April 12, 2012

Thursday, April 5, 2012

40 Years of Aislin


BY TERRY MOSHER, THE GAZETTE APRIL 4, 2012

2012 marks the 40th anniversary that  Aislin cartoons have graced The Gazette's editorial pages.
Click on the photos tab above to see a gallery of Aislin's 40 favourite cartoons.

The iPolitics Cartoons Gallery

Surprised to discover that one of my cartoon is used to announce iPolitics' Cartoon Gallery.


Here is the actual cartoon:

Wednesday, April 4, 2012

Poster of the Week

Still Waiting for Justice, Hunter Langston, Digital 2012, Detroit, Michigan 

The complete article from Center for the Study of Political Graphics' blog: